Cub Scout Pack 1776
26Sep/20

December 2nd & 9th: NOVA Out of this World

We're leaving Earth for two nights in December and going Out of This World! In this multi-part STEM program, Astro-Cubs will be learning about NASA, its Mars 2020 mission and Perseverance Rover, planets and constellations. We will putting what we've learned to the test with two STEM craft projects: build your own Mars rover and pipecleaner constellations.

Out of This World is the Cub Scout Nova Award for space exploration science. This STEM program incorporates learning with cool activities and exposure to science, technology, engineering and mathematics for Cub Scouts. To earn this award, Cub Scouts explore topics such as planets, space, space exploration, or astronomy. They must also complete one of their adventures related to astronomy, health, or design or they must do a related investigation.

While this award can only be earned by Wolves, Bears or Webelos, Lions and Tigers are encouraged to partcipate in both nights.

December 2: NASA Guest Speaker, Andy Sokol
  • Date: December 2, 2020
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. (Note earlier time)
  • Zoom link to be emailed

Mr. Andy is a Vehicle Systems engineer with NASA's Launch Services Program. Among other topics, Mr. Andy’s presentation will include discussions on NASA, the Mars 2020 mission that recently launched (and will be landing on Mars in February 2021) and the Perseverance Rover.

December 9: Pack Meeting & Out of This World STEM Projects
  • Date: December 9, 2020
  • Time: 6:30 p.m.
  • Zoom link to be emailed

Following our Opening Ceremony and Cubmaster's Minute, we will conduct our second NOVA Out of this World presentation. Here, we will reach for the stars as we learn about five main constellations, recreating them in pipecleaner form. For the second STEM project of the night, scouts will building and run their own Mars rover.

Craft materials for both the build your own Mars rover and pipecleaner constellations will be delivered to Scouts' doorsteps by December 5th.

Contact the Cubmaster to add a sibling to the delivery list.

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26Sep/20

November Hike: Sibley Volcanic Trail

Burn off some of the that Thanksgiving turkey on this cool hike:  the Volcanic Trail, once a quarry haul road.  This contains most of the stops on a self-guided volcanic tour.  The hike is about 3.5 miles long. Did you know we have a volcano in our backyard at Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve? Originally called Round Top Park, Sibley shares with Temescal and Tilden the distinction of being one of the East Bay Regional Park District's original parks. The preserve was later named in honor of Robert Sibley, who helped found the District and served for 10 years on its board of directors.

What to Bring:

  • Facecovering
  • Plenty of water and snacks
  • Layers of clothing appropriate for the weather
  • Binoculars, camera (optional)

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26Sep/20

October Hike: Las Trampas Regional Wilderness

Directions: From Highway 680: Take the Crow Canyon Road exit. Drive west on Crow Canyon for about 1 mile, then turn right (north) onto Bollinger Canyon Road. Continue about 4.5 miles to the trailhead at the end of the road. Alternatively, drive west on Bollinger until it ends at the park. It is about 10 miles from school on Bollinger Canyon Road. Meet at the parking lot at the end of the road inside the park.

Trail: Bollinger Creek Loop trail. It is a very nice nearly flat 1.5 Mile trail. It should take less than 1 hour to complete. Is is an easy hike for our younger scouts.

What to Bring:

  • Facecovering
  • Plenty of water and snacks
  • Layers of clothing appropriate for the weather
  • Binoculars, camera (optional)

Overview:
Las Trampas (Spanish for the traps) has two distinct areas, each with its own personality. Rocky Ridge, on the west side of the valley, is known for views in all directions, unusual rocks and green rolling hills lightly forested with California bays, oaks and maples. The wildflower display on the hills just off the ridgeline is an east bay favorite. The Las Trampas Ridge, to the east, is quite different, featuring a plant community dominated by chamise with other chaparral plants such as manzanitas and coyote brush.

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